About Us

The Alexander Berkman Social Club is a group of anarchists who want to talk about what anarchism is, how anarchists see things and what anarchy could look like. Named after the editor of San Francisco’s mighty The Blast, we hope to have continual monthly meetings that are open to all. If you come you’ll get a membership card, the chance to win thousands of dollars (alright – the odd book or two) and hopefully something to think about and act on. You failed the audition for “So You Think You Can Dance,” and you just don’t seem with it. Don’t worry. The ABSC will have you. See you there!

Monday, March 8, 2010

Exciting New Publication from the ABSC

The Alexander Berkman Social Club is pleased to announce our first publication, in cooperation with the Kate Sharpley Library:

The Tragic Procession: Alexander Berkman and Russian Prisoner Aid

We'll be at the San Francisco Bay Area Anarchist Bookfair this Saturday March 13 selling as many copies as we can, come find us. But if you can't make it, copies are also available through the Kate Sharpley Library and AK Press
Original reprint of the collected Bulletin of the Joint Committee for the Defense of Revolutionists Imprisoned in Russia & Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-Syndicalists Imprisoned or Exiled in Russia

Reprinted here for the first time, this collection of bulletins—edited through the years by Alexander Berkman, Mark Mratchny, Milly Witcop-Rocker, Rudolf Rocker, et al.—chronicle the gradual slaughter of a whole generation of Russian anarchists and revolutionists. They also illustrate the astonishing effort of small groups of radicals who, living often in appalling conditions themselves, attempted to both highlight the vicious reality of the Bolshevik government and alert a wider public to the awful situation its prisoners found themselves in. Imprisoned, tortured, driven mad, and exiled to places so remote no contact with the outside world was possible, the prisoners disappeared into a totalitarian darkness. Each recorded name or initial printed here signifes a life that often had been spent in revolutionary commitment, a life systematically and carefully destroyed by erstwhile “comrades.” To remember them is the least we can do.